Wishon: What swing weight should your clubs be? (2022)

In a previous article, I discussed the fitting of the shaft weight and mentioned that a discussion about the weight of a golf club should not only include shaft weight, but swing weight as well.

The reason? These two elements aresointerrelated, andsoimportantwhen it comes to helping golfers find clubs that will give them their besttempo, timing, rhythm and of course, their best shots.

BeforeI dig in any further, let’sclarify two things:

  • Shaft weightis by far the biggest contributor to thetotal weightof the club, which is simply a measurement of how heavy a club is.
  • Swing weightis the measurement of the head-weight feel of a club. A club with a heavier swing weight will feel heavier to a golfer than one with a lighter swing weight, because its balance point is closer to the club head.

As with the fitting of the shaft weight, the club fitter also has to evaluate the golfer’s transition force, tempo, strength and any pre-determined feel preference the golfer may have when making the decision ofwhat the swing weight of the clubs needs to be.

Both elements — shaft weightand swing weight — are influenced by the same golfer swing characteristics, which is why good club fitters will fit for both the shaft weight and the swing weight at the same time in the fitting process.

Inthe actual fitting process, however, the shaft weight comes first. This is because the test clubs required to focus on the fitting of shaft weight and swing weight together have to first be assembled with a shaft that the club fitter deems suitable from his analysis.

(Video) Does Swing Weight Matter?

Shaft flex and bend-profile design is also important, and I’ll cover that inmy next article. It’s why good club fitters think about weight and flex/bend profile simultaneously in the fitting process — they have to in order to come up with candidate shafts to use in the test club hitting sessions.

Once the club fitter determines a shaft with suitable weight and the best flex/bend profile characteristics for the golfer’s swing characteristics, the matter of fitting for the swing weight is done by having the golfer hit shots with a test club while adding lead tape to the club head. Shot shape, on-center hit results, and certainly the feedback from the golfer are then assessed.

Usually, it goes like this. As the golfer hits shots with the test clubs, the fitter adds lead tape to the clubs heads — about two swing weight points at a time — whileobserving the ball flight and on-center hit performance.

The fitter is also asking the golfer questions such as:

  • How does your swing tempo/timing feel?
  • Do you sense that you are fighting any tendency to be too quick with your tempo?
  • Do you sense that you have to make more of an effort to swing the club?
  • Do you feel the presence of the club head during the swing enough?
  • Do you feel that the head feels a little too light, too heavy, about right?

The club fitter has to find that point at which the golfer begins to sense either a little better feel or begin to feel that his swing tempo and timing is better for the weight feel of the test clubs. That really is the key of a successful total weight/swing weight fitting — when the golfer does not have to consciously think about his swing tempo and timing.

Itjust happens.

Andbecause the swing weight fitting process has to also include the flex/bend profile and weight of the shaft, the fitter knows that he will be switching between the different shafts he has evaluated as suitable for the golfer while he is also performing the “add a little weight at a time to the club head” evaluation to determine the best head weight feel for the golfer.

(Video) Swing weight of a golf club - Srixon 585

This is a perfect example of how experienced club fitters will “multi-task” to evaluate separate, but related specs in the fitting process, all at the same time. It’swhy good club fitters are good and others are not when it comes to simultaneously evaluating each of these separate but very much related fitting elements.

The goal in the swing weight fitting is to get the golfer to a point where he reports that the club head is starting to feel a little bit too heavy, or the club is starting to require a little more effort to swing than the golfer would prefer. At that point, the club fitter removes a little of the head weight. Then a few more shots are hit to determine if the golfer still senses the head weight feel to be too much, or just right.

It is possible that the golfer never indicates a distinct, positive feel preference for the weight feel of the test club even when the head weight is brought back from a point of feeling too heavy for the golfer. When this happens, the good club fitters know that they need to test the golfer with a different weight shaft and go through the head weight fitting process all over again.

In my previous story, I offered somebasic shaft weight fitting guidelines:

  • Strong golfers/aggressive transitions/faster tempos = heavier shaft weights
  • Weaker golfers/smooth transitions/smooth tempos = lighter shaft weights

These are guidelines that work for most golfers, but are not 100 percent set in stone for all golfers.

It is not uncommon for strong/aggressive transition/faster tempo golfers to end up being better fit into lighter shafts, but with a higher swing weight. While it certainly is less common for weaker/smooth transition/smooth tempo golfers to do better with a heavier shaft, it is not impossible.

This is why a very experienced club fitter can be worth his weight in gold. With experience come more situations in which the fitter encounters golfers who deviate from the guidelines.

(Video) WRIST TO FLOOR MEASUREMENT FOR LENGTH

Good clubfitters also realize that the interaction of shaft weight and swing weight is such that it is always possible to find strong/aggressive transition/faster tempo golfers who achieve their best tempo consistency with a lighter shaft, but with a higher swing weight to prevent the light shaft from making the clubs feel too light in some manner.

After all, there are a lot of tour players who play well with 60-to-65-gram shafts in their drivers and fairway woods. And a heavier head weight feel is how this can happen, even though logic may say that the player is too strong and forceful to be fit into such a lightweight shaft.

Sidebar: MOI Matching as an Alternative to Swing Weight Matched Clubs

Matching all clubs in a set to their MOI has become a viable alternative to swing weight matching for many golfers. MOI matching may also be thought of roughly as building the clubs in a set to progressively increase swing weights from long to short irons in the set.

Candidates for MOI matching over swing weight matching can be golfers who:

  • Go in and out of consistency issues with the irons
  • Suffer from occasional-to-frequent bouts of pulling short iron shots offline
  • Sense less comfort and consistency with the short irons vs other irons in the set

For more information on MOI matching, visit:http://wishongolf.com/clubmakers/matching-golf-clubs-by-moi/

Sidebar: Don’t Get Trapped by a Specific Swing Weight

Remember, swing weight is NOT an actual measurement of weight as are grams, ounces or pounds. Swing weight is an arbitrary measurement of the relationship of weight in a golf club about the 14-inch fulcrum point on a swing weight scale.

When fitting swing weight, good club fitters really know that they are instead fitting for the head weight feel of the golf club. They are trying to find what head weight feel is going to bring about the best swing tempo and shot consistency for the golfer based on the length, shaft weight and grip weight of the clubs.Once that best head weight feel is found for the golfer, then the club fitter can perform a swing weight measurement to have as a guideline for the other clubs in the set, or as a baseline for taking the golfer into an MOI matched set.

(Video) MOI MATCHING AS AN ALTERNATIVE

In short, the head weight feel of D2 in a club that is 45 inches with a 60-gram shaft and a 50-gram grip is not going to be the same head weight feel as D2 in a club that is 43.5 inches with an 80-gram shaft and 40-gram grip.Thus, golfers should not get locked into a particular swing weight when changing length, shaft weight, or grip weight but rather go through a new investigation into what head weight will bring about the best tempo and timing in the swing.

Good club fitters know this, so once they choose the best length, shaft weight andgrip preferred by the golfer, they fit for the best head weight feel and do not get locked into a specific swing weight.

Related

  1. What length should your clubs be?
  2. What lofts should your clubs be?
  3. Face angle is crucial for a proper fitting
  4. The best way to fit lie angle
  5. How to choose the right club head design
  6. Tom Wishon’s keys to set makeup
  7. Getting the right size grip, time after time
  8. What shaft weight should you play?
  9. What swing weight should your clubs be?
  10. What shaft flex should I use?

This story is part of a 10-part series from Tom Wishon on professional club fitting.

FAQs

What swing weight should my golf clubs be? ›

The lightest possible swing weight is A0 while the heaviest possible swing weight is F9. If you pick up a men's golf club off the rack with stock options, the swing weight will generally be between D0 and D2. With women's golf clubs, the standard range will be from C5 to C7.

What is the ideal swing weight for irons? ›

The swing weight of irons probably varies between D2 and D5 for 95% of Tour players. Most will be somewhere in this range. Players with high club head speed like Rory McIlroy or Dustin Johnson tend to be around D5-D6. Players with more average tour club head speed are around D3-D4.

Is D5 swing weight too heavy? ›

If it feels too heavy at D5, you can remove strips of lead tape one by one until it feels right. If your driver is heavier than D5, ask your club fitter to add a heavier grip or a counterweight to reduce swing weight to D5. Get Fitted By A TPT Authorized Fitter.

How do I determine my swing weight? ›

An accepted rule of thumb is that increasing or decreasing the weight of the clubhead by 2 grams will increase or decrease the swingweight by 1 and the same impact would be achieved by adding or subtracting 5 grams to or from the grip and 9 grams to or from the shaft.

What is D1 swing weight? ›

Swing Weight System

Each letter is then subdivided into tenths -- from zero tenths to nine tenths. The greater the letter or number, the heavier the club's swing weight. Therefore, a club with a swing weight of D1 is heaver than a club with a C1 swing weight, and a D4 club has a slightly greater swing weight than a D2.

What is a good swing weight for a senior golfer? ›

A swing weight between C-8 and D-1 is the best swing weight for a senior driver, and the shaft should be 55-60 grams. Loft should be 12-13 degrees or higher, and seniors should look for 2-4 degrees of hook in the face or consider an offset driver head to prevent slicing.

Should all my clubs have the same swing weight? ›

All of Your Clubs Should Have the Same Swing Weight

Even if you think your clubs are a bit light or heavy for you, all the clubs in your bag should at least be very close to the same swing weight. Using clubs with different swing weights typically leads to poor performance on the course.

Does swing weight affect distance? ›

How Much Does Swing Weight Affect Distance? Both swing weight and the total weight of the club are going to affect distance. In order to hit the ball far, you must be swinging at a high rate of speed, and the ball has to be hit in the center of the clubface.

Does a heavier golf club hit the ball farther? ›

It stands to reason that given the same swing speed, a heavier golf club will apply more force to a golf ball than a lighter one and will, therefore, result in greater distance.

What happens if swing weight is too high? ›

If the swingweight is too high, you will find yourself pushing the ball more, and the club will feel too heavy and more laborious to swing. Laboring on the course is something no one wants to do.

How heavy is D5 Swingweight? ›

A swingweight scale pivots around a point located 14" from the butt end. The balance point of our shaft in this situation hangs over the fulcrum point by 7.75".
...
How Shaft Weight Affects the Swingweight.
Raw Shaft Weight GramsCut Shaft Weight GramsSwingweight Measurement
9084.5D4
9791.0D5
10497.5D6
111104.0D7
6 more rows

What does a heavier swing weight do? ›

Swing weight is the measurement of the head-weight feel of a club. A club with a heavier swing weight will feel heavier to a golfer than one with a lighter swing weight, because its balance point is closer to the club head.

Which swing weight should I use? ›

The actual swing weight ranges roughly between C-0 and D-8. While C-0 is a swing weight that is recommended for senior women and ladies, D-8 is pretty much the maximum that is played on tour. This swing weight can usually only be achieved with heavy heads, heavy shafts and light grips.

Does losing weight affect golf swing? ›

There's no doubt that losing that extra weight (particularly in the mid-section) can help improve your swing, while becoming stronger can inject more power into your drive.

Does a lighter shaft increase swing weight? ›

When a shaft is lighter, it reduces what's known as the total weight of a golf club, which is the weight of all components: the head, the shaft, the grip, and the things that hold them together such as the tip, tape, and epoxy. When the total weight of a club is reduced, it allows some golfers to swing faster.

What does d4 swing weight mean? ›

What Is Swing Weight? | TrottieGolf - YouTube

How far should you hit a 7 iron? ›

Average 7 Iron Distance By Age
Age RangeAverage 7 Iron Distance
20-30160 yards
30-40155 yards
40-50146 yards
50-60139 yards
2 more rows

Does choking down on golf club change swing weight? ›

Choking down lightens the club's swingweight and effectively makes the shaft stiffer. It also makes it difficult to hit the ball high enough for all situations.

Should older golfers use lighter clubs? ›

While drivers and woods, because they need to be hit with faster speed, feature lighter graphite, Senior flex shafts. However, if your swing speed is very low and distance very poor as a senior golfer, make sure ALL your clubs have Senior shafts.

Are lighter golf clubs better for seniors? ›

Yes, lighter clubs are better for seniors, but the weight is removed from the shaft, rather than the clubhead itself. Steel shafts can be weightier and slow down swing speed, something most senior golfers don't want. This is why lighter, senior flex graphite shafts are the best and lightest option for senior golfers.

Does 10 grams make a difference in golf shaft? ›

While most focus more on shaft flex, shaft weight is equally important. 10 grams may not sound like a big deal, but during the golf swing, it can make a big difference. This weight can make a big difference to feel, clubhead speed and dispersion (the accuracy of your drives).

What happens when golf clubs are too light? ›

Worse, a clubhead that's too light often results in poor swing mechanics like deceleration in the downswing, sequencing issues and a swing path that hits the ball with a glancing blow. “Efficient golfers hit with their body and get their body weight into it,” Mucklow says.

What is a D7 swing weight? ›

D7 is a measurement that gives you some idea of how heavy a club will swing [ D7 is 2 points heavier than D5]. It is also a way to insure your irons are consistant and swing the same way by building them all to a D7 swing weight.

How many grams increase swing weight? ›

The general rules are that a two-gram change in clubhead weight will change the swingweight one point (heavier = higher swingweight); a five-gram change in grip weight will change the swingweight one point (heavier = lower swingweight), and a nine-gram change in shaft weight will change the swingweight one point ( ...

How do I lower my swing weight? ›

How to Change the Swing Weight of a Golf Club
  1. Add lead tape to your clubhead. This is the quickest and easiest method to increase swingweight. ...
  2. Place lead insert into the shaft at the grip end to reduce swingweight or add lead tape just below the grip. ...
  3. Change the club's shaft. ...
  4. Alter the club's grip.

Does grip size affect swing weight? ›

As you may suspect, many standard sized grips are around 52 grams so using that weight as a starting point works well. Every 4 grams +/- will alter the swing weight of a club by 1 swing weight. If a golfer changes grip size from a std. 52 gram grip to a 60 gram grip, the swing weight will change by – 2 swing weights.

How much weight do I need to change swing weight? ›

Demonstrations on Adjusting Golf Club Weight - YouTube

Does Tiger Woods use a regular or stiff shaft? ›

For example, Tiger Woods who consistently hits shots longer than 300 yards has a Regular shaft in his driver.

What is standard swing weight for a driver? ›

What Should Be the Specifications for Your Next Driver?
Cut Shaft Weight (Grams)Driver Length (Inches)Swingweight Range
4546D0-D3
4545.5C8-D1
5546D1-D4
5545.5C9-D2
6 more rows

What does a heavier swing weight do? ›

Swing weight is the measurement of the head-weight feel of a club. A club with a heavier swing weight will feel heavier to a golfer than one with a lighter swing weight, because its balance point is closer to the club head.

Should all my golf clubs be the same swing weight? ›

All of Your Clubs Should Have the Same Swing Weight

Even if you think your clubs are a bit light or heavy for you, all the clubs in your bag should at least be very close to the same swing weight. Using clubs with different swing weights typically leads to poor performance on the course.

Which swing weight should I use? ›

The actual swing weight ranges roughly between C-0 and D-8. While C-0 is a swing weight that is recommended for senior women and ladies, D-8 is pretty much the maximum that is played on tour. This swing weight can usually only be achieved with heavy heads, heavy shafts and light grips.

Does swing weight affect accuracy? ›

The better a club feels, the easier it is to use and the more accurate the results that you will be able to produce with the club. The swing weight is essentially how light or how heavy a club feels to a golfer.

Does a heavier golf club hit the ball farther? ›

It stands to reason that given the same swing speed, a heavier golf club will apply more force to a golf ball than a lighter one and will, therefore, result in greater distance.

What is a d4 swing weight? ›

What Is Swing Weight? | TrottieGolf - YouTube

Does grip size affect swing weight? ›

As you may suspect, many standard sized grips are around 52 grams so using that weight as a starting point works well. Every 4 grams +/- will alter the swing weight of a club by 1 swing weight. If a golfer changes grip size from a std. 52 gram grip to a 60 gram grip, the swing weight will change by – 2 swing weights.

Does a lighter shaft increase swing weight? ›

When a shaft is lighter, it reduces what's known as the total weight of a golf club, which is the weight of all components: the head, the shaft, the grip, and the things that hold them together such as the tip, tape, and epoxy. When the total weight of a club is reduced, it allows some golfers to swing faster.

Should wedges be heavier than irons? ›

The heavier head weight of golf wedges provides more momentum with shorter swings thereby helping get the ball up and out around the green. If you look at the swingweight specification for the name brand wedges you will notice they are higher in relationship to the numbered irons.

Does losing weight affect golf swing? ›

There's no doubt that losing that extra weight (particularly in the mid-section) can help improve your swing, while becoming stronger can inject more power into your drive.

Videos

1. Wishon Golf - What Does Custom Fitting Actually Do for Golfers?
(Wishon Golf)
2. Difference Between Swing Weight Matching & MOI Matching In Golf Clubs
(Heiser Golf)
3. Does size matter? Wishon Golf’s new Sterling Single Length Irons tested
(Today's Golfer)
4. THE STATE OF MODERN DRIVER HEAD DESIGN
(Wishon Golf)
5. Hosel Confusion, Bending Hosels to match Specs
(Wishon Golf)
6. WIshon Golf - The Facts of Life About the Golf Equipment Industry
(Wishon Golf)

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