Truth For Teachers - Book review: The Daily 5 (2022)

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Uncategorized | Jul 26, 2010

Truth For Teachers - Book review: The Daily 5 (5)

By Angela Watson

Founder and Writer

Truth For Teachers - Book review: The Daily 5 (7)

I’ve never had so many web visitors ask for my opinion on a book as I have with The Daily 5: Fostering Literacy Independence in the Elementary Grades. And as soon as I started reading, I realized why.

“The sisters” are obviously long-lost relatives of mine.

Let’s run down the list of similarities here, shall we? Gail Boushey and Joan Moser were classroom teachers when they wrote the book and tell about systems they created with their own students, they don’t advocate one ‘right’ way to teach that requires you to throw out everything else you do, and they show you how to teach your students to run the classroom. Check, check, and CHECK. I’m totally on board.

Most of you reading this review are already familiar with the Daily 5 (it’s been out since 2006), so I’ll make this less of a book summary and more of an opinion piece. I loved how readable the book was. The tone was conversational and easy-to-understand. I loved the ongoing discussion of how their teaching practice has changed and evolved over the years. Not only does this make the sisters seem like real people who didn’t start off as master teachers on day one, but it gives permission to the rest of us to grow and let go of ineffective practices we’ve become attached to. I also love how the book emphasizes the element of choice for children. This truly is a student-centered way to run your literacy block.

But mostly, I love the way the sisters emphasize modeling and practice for routines. This is something I’ve been droning on about for years, but I’ve never seen the concept so perfectly explained for the context of literacy routines. Even if you’re not using the Daily 5, the procedures the book advocates for teaching children to be independent is applicable to whatever literacy tasks you have them regularly complete…and would work for math routines, too. The explanation of how to model and practice is definitely the crown jewel of The Daily 5.

There were two aspects of teaching routines in The Daily 5 that I had never thought about. The first is doing 3 minute practice periods to build stamina. My practice periods were usually starting at 10 minutes for 3rd graders, but the sisters point out that you must stop before any children have a chance to get off-task: start small so they can be successful and train their ‘muscle memories’ to complete the procedure correctly. The other new concept for me is the premise of not managing with eye control or proximity (my two favorite techniques) when practicing literacy routines. This was a radical idea in my mind: What, no raised eyebrows and the ‘um-i-don’t-think-so-buddy’ glare when a kid starts picking at his shoelaces instead of reading? Not during the Daily 5 stamina-building sessions. Instead, you’re supposed to stop the whole class and revisit the anchor chart so kids can reflect on their own practices. We’re talking student ownership on the next level.

Obviously since I’m obsessed with teaching routines and procedures, I really keyed in on that aspect. As for the Daily 5 elements themselves (Read to Self, Read to Someone, Listen to Reading, Work on Writing, and Word Work)…I can get with those, too. The concepts aren’t anything revolutionary, nor do the sisters claim they are–they’re just best practices that focus on authentic reading rather than teacher-contrived busywork. These elements have been going on in classrooms for a long time under many pseudonyms, and they work. I found yet another commonality with my long-lost sisters in that I, too, started making the switch from assigning reading activities to having kids READ after studying Regie Routman’s Reading Essentials. That book changed everything for me, and it heavily influenced the sisters, too.

The only downside of The Daily 5 being such a short and easy read is that it’s possibly TOO short–personally, I would like to have read a lot more than 100 pages on this topic. The book left me with a number of unanswered questions. For example, the recommended daily schedule shows whole-group reading instruction being completed solely in four 5-7 minute mini lessons. How could that be possible, especially if you’re mandated to use a basal or complete daily test prep practice? Wouldn’t longer lessons be needed in the upper elementary grades in which skills are more complex? I headed over to the website to look for support, but was disappointed to find that the online resources are available only for members at the rate of $39 for a 3 month subscription or $69 annually (um, ouch.) So I started a Daily 5 discussion on Facebook and found, as usual, that teachers have all the answers I’m looking for. Not only did they explain that the Daily 5 Structure is highly adaptable and it’s the teacher’s choice how long the mini-lessons run, they explained just how they use the structure in their own classrooms and gave practical tips.

Wonderful, practical, and free advice from teachers on how they implement The Daily 5 is abundant on the web (especially on the ProTeacher message boards). I’ve researched their reviews extensively, and the overwhelming response from classroom teachers is that IT WORKS. The Daily 5 has an incredible following of teachers whose students can’t wait for the literacy block each day because they’ve developed such a deep love of reading that’s totally independent of adult direction. What more could we want for our students? Go ‘head, sisters.

(Video) Classroom Vlog! Week in the Life as A 5th Grade teacher! | High-Vibe Teacher Life

*review copy provided by Stenhouse Publishers

Truth For Teachers - Book review: The Daily 5 (8)

Angela Watson

Founder and Writer

Angela created the first version of this site in 2003, when she was a classroom teacher herself. With 11 years of teaching experience and more than a decade of experience as an instructional coach, Angela oversees and contributes regularly to...

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Discussion

  1. Angela,

    Thanks for your opinions on the Daily 5. I will be starting this along with CAFE using my basal next year. I’m excited for the challenge. I have to get my kids to pass the FCAT and last year (after reading Reading Essentials too) had my kids read more in a reader’s workshop style. Every one of my kids, including my ESOL child who was reading at 1st grade level, passed! I can’t wait to use this format so I can reach more kids individually while the rest are doing authentic reading tasks. I’ll also be starting the Responsive Classroom approach that ties in well for behavior management. I do agree that the cost for membership to the sisters’ site is steep. Thankfully Iwork at a Title 1 school and they were able to purchase it for me. That’s an idea for anyone else who works at a Title 1 school. Thanks again for your thoughts!

    Marlene

    (Video) The World's Right Rises | Ep. 1099

    Reply

    1. Marlene, that’s great to hear how well your kids did last year with the reader’s workshop style! It was very hard for me to stick with that when I taught at Title I schools in Florida–there was so much pressure to test prep all. the. time. I’m proud of you for knowing what’s best for kids and doing it! I think you’ll LOVE Responsive Classroom–I really can’t speak highly enough of that approach, especially for low-income schools. And good idea to try to get Title I to pay for the Daily 5/CAFE membership costs. Thanks for that tip!

      Reply

      1. Marlene,
        I used Daily 5 for the last 2 years in my former district, along with Responsive Classroom, with great results. All of my students passed the state test- and better yet, they LOVED reading and writing. Our principal often commented on how involved the kids were with what they were doing- half the time they wouldn’t even notice that someone new had walked into the room! Good luck- and remember to really follow the Sisters’ steps…building stamina is key. First we get started, then we get better!

        Reply

  2. Hi Angela,

    Thanks so much for posting your comments about the Daily 5. I stumbled upon this book last summer and I enjoyed it, but I had the same issues with it that you had. So, I decided to put it aside. After 4 years of teaching 2nd grade, I’m still looking for the ultimate Reader’s Workshop/Literacy Centers. After reading your post and checking out the other teachers’ suggestions on proteacher.com, I have found renewed inspiration and will revisit this book and attempt to apply the Daily 5 this year! Thank you so much!

    Sylvie (a.k.a. Headless Chicken)

    Reply

    1. Headless chicken, huh? LOL! I think as you revisit The Daily 5 book, you’ll definitely find some concepts you want to try out this year. There is sooo much online support around the web, and when you post your questions for other teachers to answer, you’ll get replies right away that inspire you to jump right in. I’m a little sad that I don’t have my own classroom anymore so *I* can try it out! 🙁 But, I definitely will be recommending the strategies to the teachers I coach.

      Reply

  3. Hi Angela,

    It has long been my opinion that you would be right on board with the Sisters’ philosophies. In fact I’d wondered why you hadn’t mentioned them before! Last year I started the Daily 5 and CAFE in my classroom, and after seeing the Sisters speak in Iowa I shelled out the 70$ for the website access. Because I was doing this all on my own, I felt it was worth it to get that support. Recently the time came for my membership to expire and I had to think about that 70$ again–and I just had to renew it. So much new content has been added, (they’ve been posting videos and book excerpts for the Math Daily 5) and the videos are SO helpful, and to top it off the Sisters are so sweet and funny–sometimes after a crazy day, clicking on a video of Joan Moser explaining how she organizes her Word Work materials just calms me right down and helps me refocus. If she can do it, so can I! 🙂 I think it’s crazy that as a teacher I have to spend my own money (which, ahem, is less than it should be! Inner-city Catholic school teacher here!) for this kind of thing, but for me it’s a worthwhile expense because it really has helped me improve my practice, and I’ve seen great things from my students, which is what it’s all about! Honestly, if you started posting videos of model lessons and room tours, I’d probably pay for that too! (Joking aside, maybe you would consider posting a video or two in the future?)

    Thanks for writing about this subject. I would definitely recommend you read the CAFE book too—for the longest time I stayed away from Daily 5 and CAFE, because I thought they were just cheesy acronyms for another product someone was trying to sell us teachers. But it’s the real deal and it really helps teachers achieve what we all strive for every day! On a side note, I want to let you know I really appreciate and enjoy your devotional posts. They always seem to come at exactly the right moment…funny how that works, isn’t it? 🙂

    (Video) max’s sarcastic face is everything #strangerthings

    Amy

    Reply

    1. Hi, Amy! You know, I never had any interest in the approach for the same reason you ignored it–I assumed it was some new-fangled reading program that I couldn’t possibly implement because my school district already prescribed everything down to the way I breathed. And I love the reader’s workshop approach and figured nothing could top that. But once people started explaining how The Daily 5 works (and how it works WITH your current reading program), I was definitely intrigued! It’s good to hear your opinion on whether the web resources on the two sister’s site are worth the money. Thanks for sharing that! And yes, I do plan on posting some videos! I’ve been putting it off for a few reasons (getting parental permission to show kids is one reason, not liking to watch myself on video is another, heh heh) but I really do need to just get with the program! At this point I don’t imagine charging for that–I really, really want to keep everything on my site free, and the cost of shooting and uploading short video clips is pretty low. Thanks also for the encouragement about the devotions: I definitely believe the ideas are placed on my heart at a certain moment for the benefit of very specific people. It’s awesome to hear from those people from time to time. 🙂

      Reply

  4. Hi,

    I’m going to be the odd-duck here, but I’m a homeschooling mom- sitting in Barnes & Nobles right now with a copy of the sister’s The Cafe Book- and looking for more info on the Daily 5. Your review is extremely helpful, I’ll be heading over to your fb page.

    I’m a very unscheduled artsy/feeling person, but I know kids do better with a routine..I keep trying to wrap my brain around some kind of routine I can keep- and independent learning is totally possible with my group of 5…I just need a routine that is easy to implement and not too complicated. This looks adaptable to my daily needs. I have a reading challenged student, I do need a way to track our goals and accomplishments. Thanks for writing this. 🙂

    Reply

    1. Hah, Jenny, sounds like you do what I do–get online in the bookstore to read reviews! I can’t even shop in bookstores now, I’m so dependent on Amazon reviews and other online sources to tell me if something’s worth buying. Somehow I do think the Daily 5 will be useful for you as a homeschool mom. It will help you teach your kids independent reading and writing skills. Let me know how you implement–I’m interesting to see your take on things. 🙂

      Reply

  5. Kinda crazy–seems this review was written just for me! A series of strange coincidences led me to this article today, and I was already planning to start reading The Daily 5 on Monday since we are implementing it (and CAFE) in my school in the fall! This has given me the encouragement that I needed to start “back-to-school” planning.

    Reply

    1. Hi, Letitia, that’s awesome that you feel inspired to plan now! Trust me, Daily 5 is an easy and fun read. Once you start, you’ll *really* be in the mood to get started for the fall! 🙂

      Reply

      (Video) 5 things to practice every day to improve your English communication skills

12Next »

FAQs

What are the 5 components of Daily 5? ›

Daily 5 is a literacy management system developed by Joan Moser and Gail Boucher, 2 sisters from America. The system has 5 components- read to self, read to someone, listen to reading, work on writing and word work. Students are explicitly taught how to work within each component to achieve success.

Is Daily 5 researched based? ›

Although there is a limited research regarding the Daily 5 as a whole, there are significant bodies of research on each of the five components that make up Daily 5.

What is the Daily 5 model? ›

Daily 5 is a literacy framework that instills behaviors of independence, creates a classroom of highly engaged readers, writers, and learners, and provides teachers with time and structure to meet diverse student needs.

What does cafe stand for in Daily 5? ›

CAFE is an acronym for Comprehension, Accuracy, Fluency, and Expand Vocabulary. The CAFE Menu breaks each component—comprehension, accuracy, fluency, and expand vocabulary—into significant strategies that support each goal.

How do you implement the Daily 5? ›

  1. Choice #1: Read to Self.
  2. Choice #2: Work on Writing.
  3. Choice #3: Read to Someone.
  4. Choice #4: Listen to Reading.
  5. Choice #5: Word Work.
22 Dec 2015

How do I introduce the Daily 5? ›

When we first began developing Daily 5, the order we typically introduced each of the Daily 5 choices was: Read to Self, Read to Someone, Work on Writing, Listen to Reading and lastly Word Work. As we've continued to work with children, we've refined our thinking and practice.

What is balanced literacy framework? ›

A typical balanced literacy framework consists of five components including read aloud, guided reading, shared reading, independent reading, and word study. Role of the teacher. Skillful teachers use their knowledge of literacy development and processes to decide where to go next.

What is the literacy framework? ›

Implement our resources within a variety of frameworks to achieve literacy proficiency. Frameworks summarize the guiding principles and practices for students to achieve reading success with high-quality resources and instruction.

What is daily five in school? ›

The Daily 5 is a structure for learning. It has 5 components that can be taught daily: 1) read to self, 2) read to someone, 3) listen to reading, 4) word work, and 5) writing.

Why is it called Daily 5? ›

Listen To Reading

However, the Daily 5 was so named because it includes 5 literacy tasks that will help your students grow as readers and writers. The final two are Listen to Reading and Read to Someone.

How long should Daily 5 take? ›

Primary—Focus lessons in grades K–2 are 5–7 minutes in length, and Daily 5 sessions typically end up being 15–25 minutes long.

Is Daily 5 appropriate for kindergarten? ›

Daily 5 is used successfully in PreK–12 classrooms all over the world. Kindergarten students love their newfound independence, fourth-grade students appreciate choice, and eighth-grade students enjoy the extended time reading self-selected books.

What is the difference between CAFE and daily 5? ›

During literacy time, teachers teach a brief focus lesson (CAFE), followed by students choosing one of five authentic tasks—Read to Self, Read to Someone, Listen to Reading, Word Work, or Work on Writing (Daily 5).

What does daily five look like in kindergarten? ›

Daily 5 - Kindergarten - YouTube

What is daily 3 in math? ›

Math Daily 3 is a framework for structuring math time so students develop deep conceptual understanding, mathematical proficiency, and a true love of mathematics. This framework can be adapted to district-adopted curriculums and state mandates.

How do I organize my Daily 5 rotations? ›

Guided Reading | Daily 5 Rotations Board - YouTube

What is the purpose of guided reading? ›

Guided reading helps students develop greater control over the reading process through the development of reading strategies which assist decoding and construct meaning. The teacher guides or 'scaffolds' their students as they read, talk and think their way through a text (Department of Education, 1997).

How can I monitor my learning? ›

5 Monitoring Techniques That Deepen Student Learning
  1. 1) Entrance and Exit Tickets. As students arrive and/or leave the classroom, require them to demonstrate mastery of key parts of the content. ...
  2. 2) Student Reflection. ...
  3. 3) Revising Knowledge. ...
  4. 4) Accountable Answers. ...
  5. 5) Summarizing.
1 Dec 2017

Which choice of the Daily 5 should be introduced first? ›

Read to Self is the first choice we introduce and the most important. Students don't become readers with computer programs and busy work. Students fall in love with reading when they are given time to read and learn in a classroom where books are valued.

What are the Big 5 areas of reading? ›

The National Reading Panel identified five key concepts at the core of every effective reading instruction program: Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension.

How do you introduce yourself when reading? ›

10 Steps to Launch Read to Self
  1. Identify what is to be taught: Read to Self.
  2. Set a purpose: Create a sense of urgency. ...
  3. Identify the behaviors of Read to Self on I-chart.
  4. Model most-desirable behaviors.
  5. Model least-desirable, then most-desirable behaviors (same student)

What are the 5 components of balanced literacy? ›

The five components of balanced literacy include read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, independent reading, and word study. The information obtained through reading instruction is also incorporated into writing lessons in a similar format.

What are the 4 components of a balanced literacy? ›

During balanced literacy Reading Workshops, skills are explicitly modeled during mini-lessons. The mini-lesson has four parts: the connection, the teach (demonstration), the active engagement and the link.

What are the big 5 literacy strategies? ›

In accordance with our commitment to deliver reading programs based on research-based instructional strategies, Read Naturally's programs develop and support the five (5) components of reading identified by the National Reading Panel—phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

Is science of reading evidence based? ›

The science of reading has culminated in a preponderance of evidence to inform how proficient reading and writing develop; why some have difficulty; and how we can most effectively assess and teach and, therefore, improve student outcomes through prevention of and intervention for reading difficulties.

Why is literacy framework important? ›

The purpose of developing a Literacy Framework is to articulate the district's approach to curriculum, instruction, assessment, materials/resources, and organization which will enable all students to develop the literacy skills needed to be college, career, and life ready.

What is the literacy and numeracy framework? ›

So, the Literacy and Numeracy Framework was started in 2013 to help pupils, aged 5 to 14, with their reading and writing skills. The Digital Competence Framework (DCF) was developed in 2015 by the Minister for Education and Skills and was available from September 2016.

Can you use Daily 5 Middle School? ›

But, I have learned that Daily 5 can be tremendously fun and successful for upper elementary and middle school students as well. If you are not already using Daily 5 in your upper elementary or middle school classroom, I highly recommend you give it a try this year!

Do digital skills and literacies need to be taught? ›

Teaching kids digital literacy skills is very important. Kids need to be able to understand the technology that they use so they can use it safely and effectively. Digital literacy is not just about knowing how to take a selfie or update facebook.

What is the science of reading approach? ›

The science of reading is a body of research that incorporates insights and research from disciplines that include developmental psychology, educational psychology, cognitive science, and cognitive neuroscience.

Is Daily 5 GOOD? ›

Daily 5 is incredibly effective. Students work independently during rotations which means you are free to work with students individually or in small groups to support them. This allows you to target their instruction for their specific needs.

How do you use centers in the classroom? ›

Gather the materials, write out directions, and set behavioral expectations.
  1. Gather Student Materials.
  2. Write out Clear Directions With Visuals.
  3. Set Behavioral Goals and Expectations.
  4. Keep Groups to Five Students.
  5. Get Creative With the Setup.
  6. Keep Materials Organized.
  7. Provide Cleanup Time.
  8. Explain Your Expectations.
17 Oct 2019

How do you structure a kindergarten day? ›

Sample of a Full Day Kindergarten Schedule
  1. 8:25-9:00 Arrival. Students begin arriving at school. ...
  2. 9:00-9:20 Morning Work and Attendance. ...
  3. 9:20- Clean up and Transition to Carpet. ...
  4. 9:25 – 9:50 Morning Meeting. ...
  5. 9:50-10:00 Bathroom Break. ...
  6. 10:00-10:10 SNACK.
  7. 10:10-11:15 Language Arts and Literacy Centers. ...
  8. 11:20-11:50 Specials.

What is Daily 5 in 2nd grade? ›

Daily 5 is a literacy framework that instills behaviors of independence, creates a classroom of highly engaged readers, writers, and learners, and provides teachers with the time and structure to meet diverse student needs.

What is word work? ›

Word work is the practice of working with words in some capacity. This can be working with a phonics pattern, memorizing sight words (also known as high-frequency words), looking at word families, producing rhyming words, practicing prefixes and suffixes and so much more.

What are math centers? ›

Math centers are learning stations within your classroom that help students to practice the math skills that they have learned in a hands-on, practical way. They provide an opportunity for students to see how math works on a physical level rather than just learning from a book or being told.

What are guided reading groups? ›

Guided Reading is a time for teachers to work with a small group of students. These small groups are made up of students who need similar reading skills and strategies. During this time, the teacher supports students in each group by providing appropriate guidance before, during, and after reading the same book.

What does a comprehensive literacy framework include? ›

The process includes reading (and reading foundational skills), writing, speaking, listening, and language across all disciplines to comprehend and create text for effective communication with others in a variety of contexts.

What is successful technology integration? ›

"Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and synthesize the information, and present it professionally.

What are the 5 components of Daily 5? ›

Daily 5 is a literacy management system developed by Joan Moser and Gail Boucher, 2 sisters from America. The system has 5 components- read to self, read to someone, listen to reading, work on writing and word work. Students are explicitly taught how to work within each component to achieve success.

What is word work in kindergarten? ›

Essentially, word work in kindergarten is discovering and working with high frequency words, word patterns, word families, and vocabulary. These activity ideas that I am sharing today can be used in a variety of settings, whether it is during whole class, small group, partners or as an independent choice for students.

Why is guided math important? ›

Guided math provides a structure for teachers to differentiate instruction so they can reach and teach every student by: Creating flexible small groups that allow students to work in their zone of proximal development so they can learn exactly what they need to know at their instructional level.

What is a guided math lesson? ›

What is Guided Math? Guided math is a structure of teaching math that allows teachers to meet the needs of all of their learners. This type of teaching structure typically consists of a mini-lesson and then the teacher pulling small groups while the rest of the students work through math centers.

What is a math workshop? ›

Also known as Guided Math, the Math Workshop model combines direct instruction with hands-on and student-centered learning opportunities. The workshop begins with a mini-lesson delivered by the teacher, followed by a large block of time devoted to small group learning. It ends with a brief closure activity, or summary.

What are the 5 pillars of literacy? ›

The National Reading Panel identified five key concepts at the core of every effective reading instruction program: Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension.

What is the Big 5 in reading? ›

In accordance with our commitment to deliver reading programs based on research-based instructional strategies, Read Naturally's programs develop and support the five (5) components of reading identified by the National Reading Panel—phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

How long does daily 5 take? ›

Primary—Focus lessons in grades K–2 are 5–7 minutes in length, and Daily 5 sessions typically end up being 15–25 minutes long.

What is a daily Programme in ECD? ›

The Daily Programme. The daily programme is carefully tailored to balance periods of structured learning with creative activities, ring time and free play. Snack time, music, stories and generous amounts of outdoor play also make up the morning routine.

What are 4 types of reading? ›

Four Reading Skills—From Skimming and Scanning to Intensive and Extensive Reading
  • Skimming.
  • Scanning.
  • Intensive.
  • Extensive.
18 Jan 2021

What are the 6 components of literacy? ›

Research has shown that there are six key components that contribute to successful beginning reading. Because of the importance of these components, they have become known as the 'Big Six': oral language, phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency and comprehension.

What type of phonics is best to teaching reading? ›

It has been proven that Explicit phonics is the most effective type of phonics instruction and really helps those struggling readers. It is necessary for anyone with a processing disorder.

How can I improve reading skills? ›

6 Strategies to Improve Reading Comprehension
  1. Have them read aloud. ...
  2. Provide books at the right level. ...
  3. Reread to build fluency. ...
  4. Talk to the teacher. ...
  5. Supplement their class reading. ...
  6. Talk about what they're reading.
30 Aug 2022

What's the difference between phonics and phonemic awareness? ›

Phonics focuses on how sounds look in writing, while phonemic awareness is understanding that each word is comprised of a series of sounds. Consequently, most phonics instruction is written, and most phonemic awareness lessons are oral.

What are the Big 5 in education? ›

The Big 5 are: Alphabet Knowledge and Early Writing; Background Knowledge; Book Knowledge and Print Concepts; Oral Language and Vocabulary; and Phonological Awareness. You will find all the resources organized by the five key skills that lead to later school success for all children.

Why is it called Daily 5? ›

If your time is limited, those are the work sessions that students should complete every day. However, the Daily 5 was so named because it includes 5 literacy tasks that will help your students grow as readers and writers. The final two are Listen to Reading and Read to Someone.

Is Daily 5 appropriate for kindergarten? ›

Daily 5 is used successfully in PreK–12 classrooms all over the world. Kindergarten students love their newfound independence, fourth-grade students appreciate choice, and eighth-grade students enjoy the extended time reading self-selected books.

Can the Daily 5 be used for middle school? ›

But, I have learned that Daily 5 can be tremendously fun and successful for upper elementary and middle school students as well. If you are not already using Daily 5 in your upper elementary or middle school classroom, I highly recommend you give it a try this year!

What is the importance of using a daily programme? ›

Since keeping a daily routine helps to stay organized and focused, it's also a means for achieving the work-life balance. Thanks to regular habits and self-discipline, you can clearly see when things get out of your hand. That allows you to reorganize your schedule and adjust to possible changes.

What are the 6 Elda's? ›

Communication. Exploring mathematics. Creativity. Knowledge and understanding of the world.

Why is a daily schedule important? ›

Your daily routine influences your quality of rest. Your sleep schedule and bedtime habits affect your mental sharpness, performance, emotional well-being and energy level. It's best if you can maintain a consistent time for waking and going to bed. Better health is a result of just a little extra planning.

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